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By John Hick

This research takes complete account of the findings of the social and old sciences whereas delivering a spiritual interpretation of the religions as various culturally conditioned responses to a transcendent Divine fact. The paintings relies at the author's Gifford Lectures, 1986-7. It treats the valuable subject matters within the philosophy of faith and establishes either a foundation for non secular confirmation this present day and a framework for the constructing around the globe inter-faith discussion. John Hick is the writer of many books at the philosophy of faith together with "Problems of non secular Pluralism", "Evil and the God of Love", "Death and everlasting Life", "God and the Universe of Faiths" and "Faith and Knowledge".

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'This booklet is a special contribution to the advance of a box conception of faith. It justifies spiritual trust at the foundation of our adventure, particularly spiritual adventure, and issues out the life of assets in the significant global religions to solve the modern pressing difficulties of spiritual pluralism. The author's new test is particularly useful for all international religions together with Buddhism.' - Professor Masao Abe, Pacific tuition of faith, California --This textual content refers to an out of print or unavailable variation of this title.

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An Interpretation of Religion: Human Responses to the Transcendent (2nd Edition)

This research takes complete account of the findings of the social and historic sciences whereas delivering a spiritual interpretation of the religions as assorted culturally conditioned responses to a transcendent Divine truth. The paintings is predicated at the author's Gifford Lectures, 1986-7. It treats the crucial themes within the philosophy of faith and establishes either a foundation for spiritual confirmation this present day and a framework for the constructing world wide inter-faith discussion.

Extra resources for An Interpretation of Religion: Human Responses to the Transcendent (2nd Edition)

Example text

But nevertheless the theistic associations of the term are so strong that such a usage is always liable to misunderstanding and could well appear to Buddhists, advaitic Hindus, Taoists and Confucians as linguistically imperialistic; and this would only hinder the presentation of a general theory of religion which is intended to be acceptable to the more global-minded members of all traditions. We therefore have such options as the Transcendent, the Ultimate, Ultimate Reality, the Supreme Principle, the Divine, the One, the Eternal, the Eternal One, the Real.

Indeed if we, and the earliest disciples, did not bring an existing moral discernment to our encounter with Jesus we would never have recognised him in the first place as a 'window onto God'. If we had reason to believe that he was devious, selfish, dishonest we would never have come to take him as our lord. And so his moral teaching, which presupposes whilst it deepens and widens our existing moral discernment, does not depend upon questionable miracle stories for its validity and for its inherent claim upon us.

Thus Plantinga says that, 'Hick's idea, I think, is that those who practice the great religions refer to [the Real] when (as it seems to them) they refer to God, Allah, Brahman, Shiva, Vishnu, the Dharmakaya, or whatever. So Christians think they refer to a being who is personal, loving, knowledgeable, and the like; the fact is, however, that they do not refer to such a being, but to a being who doesn't have any of these properties or, indeed, any other positive properties of which we have a grasp' (Plantinga 2000, 49-50).

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